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Tuesday, December 29, 2009

I recently mentioned that A. Chandler, an Amazon.Com Top 100 reviewer, had posted a review of The Acorn Stories, titled “A light hearted read with stories that flow smoothly and a dash of humor.” Chandler is now the #1 reviewer there.

More reviews by A. Chandler.

Wednesday, December 09, 2009

SF Universe reports that Demons Are Coming to BBC America, January 2. A secret team recruits a teenaged descendent of Van Helsing to fight things bumping in the night. Christian Cooke plays the descendent, Luke Rutherford.

The videos I’ve seen posted make it look fun, with a good combination of danger, humor, and creature effects. It sounds like the perfect companion to BBC America’s Being Human. Like that show, though, the season ends way too quickly.


Monday, December 07, 2009

Shank, a gay-themed DVD, comes out Tuesday, December 8. Pictured (from right): Tom Bott (Jonno), Alice Payne (Nessa), Wayne Virgo (Cal), and Marc Laurent (Olivier).

An eighteen-year-old gang member tries to hide his homosexuality amid a violent life in this gritty British drama. Shank offers a frank, disturbing look at life on the street.

Read my DVD review at ThisWeekInTexas.Com.


Duane Simolke wrote Holding Me Together and The Acorn Stories.

Monday, November 30, 2009


Writer/director David Lewis presents a romantic story in a beautiful setting. Everett (Brendan Bradley) and Chase (Matthew Montgomery) fall in love among the California redwoods, despite the family that will soon return to Everett’s life.

Read my review of the gay-themed DVD Redwoods at ThisWeekInTexas.Com.

Duane Simolke wrote Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure and The Acorn Stories.

Friday, November 20, 2009

Hollywood je t'Aime: DVD Review.

Writer/director and former Odessa, Texas, resident Jason Bushman directs his first feature-length film. The offbeat comedy Hollywood je t'Aime brings a gay Parisian to California, where he meets interesting characters and tries to start a film career.

Read my review at ThisWeekInTexas.Com.

Monday, November 16, 2009

Make the Yuletide Gay: DVD Review

Writer/director Rob Williams brings Christmas to gay audiences with a sweet romantic comedy about how young love and coming out can both complicate family life. Keith Jordan and Adamo Ruggiero show strong chemistry in this award-winning film.

Read my review at ThisWeekInTexas.Com.

Wednesday, November 04, 2009

The gay arts, entertainment, and equality site StoneWall Society

The gay arts, entertainment, and equality site StoneWall Society is celebrating its ten-year anniversary with the launch of new sister sites.

Equality Net will focus on human rights for all people. Artists for Equality will provide promotional opportunities for artists who join Equality Net. GLBT Artists, part of the OutVoice Banner Program, is similar. However, as its name suggests, it will focus on GLBT artists and issues. On Equal Grounds will provide web hosting and other services.

Watch those sites for more information. SWS has helped my books receive much more publicity than they would otherwise.

Tuesday, November 03, 2009

A. Chandler, a Top 100 reviewer, has posted a review of The Acorn Stories, titled “A light hearted read with stories that flow smoothly and a dash of humor.”

More reviews by A. Chandler.

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Gay Science Fiction, the first trailer for Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure, has received 4000 viewings at YouTube! The second trailer has received almost 300 views, and it’s a YouTube Featured Video.

Monday, October 12, 2009

Books and links for my readers in Australia and New Zealand.

* Google Australia * Yahoo! 7
* Web Wombat * Aus. Search Colossus * National Library of Australia * Sensis.Com
* Aus Everything * Search NZ * NZ Search Engines * Australia: An Introduction * A Concise History of NZ * Best of New Zealand Fiction: Volume 1 * The Lord of the Rings Location Guidebook
* Gay Happening Presents Best Gay Pride & CSD Anthems * Invisible Families: NZ Resource for Parents of Lesbian and Gay Children * Worlds in Collision: The Gay Debate in NZ * Depraved and Disorderly: Female Convicts, Sexuality and Gender in Colonial Australia * Lesbian Studies in Aotearoa / New Zealand * Mates and Lovers: A History of Gay New Zealand * The Best Australian Science Fiction * Great Australian Cookbook
* Destitute Gourmet * Gay and Lesbian Rights Lobby of Australia: Links (including DuaneSimolke.Com) *

Holding Me Together, featuring Reactions to Homophobia.
Pride in the Arts Award. Book Trailer, Book Trailer 2. Kris Coonan, UQ Union, University of Queensland, used Reactions to Homophobia as a resource for his article Sexual Prejudice: Understanding Homophobia and Heterosexism, Biphobia and Transphobia. The Queensland Government's Community Benefit Fund and PFLAG Brisbane used it as a resource for the PDF booklet Assisting Those Who Come Into Regular Contact with Lesbian and Gay Youth.


Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure.
The brilliant scientist Taldra loves her twin gay sons and thinks of them as the hope for Valchondria’s future, but one of them becomes entangled in the cult of Degranon, while the other becomes stranded on the other side of a doorway through time. Can they find their way home and help Taldra save their world?



Stein, Gender, Isolation, and Industrialism: New Readings of Winesburg, Ohio. This book examines Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio, as it relates to Gertrude Stein, gender roles, gay subtext, failed communication, and the machine in the garden. Anderson's friendship with and admiration of Stein greatly affected the contents and writing style of Winesburg.

The Acorn Gathering: Writers Uniting Against Cancer.

The Acorn Stories.

The Return of Innocence.

Sunday, October 11, 2009

Diverse Universes Search.


Search for gay science fiction, gay pride, and much more, including general scifi/fantasy.

Friday, October 02, 2009

Lubbock, Texas, the week of October 5: homeComing OUT Week at Texas Tech University will include activist Shelby Knox, musical duo Jason & deMarco, a discussion about outing people, an epilogue to The Laramie Project, and various other events. The life of former Lubbock resident Shelby Knox provided the basis for the documentaries The Education of Shelby Knox and Shelby Knox Redux.

Sunday, September 20, 2009

Joe Sears and Jaston Williams will bring their play Tuna Does Vegas here to Lubbock, Texas, on March 5-6. As with their other Tuna plays, the two men play a variety of eccentric characters from a West Texas town. I’ve seen the DVDs of Greater Tuna and A Tuna Christmas, but haven’t seen any of the Tuna productions live. Sears and Williams are hilarious, capturing the quirky sides of West Texans way too well, but also showing a love for West Texas.

Lubbock Show Information.

Tuna Does Vegas on Tour.

Saturday, September 12, 2009

Sherwood Anderson News.

The Roanoke Times: Sherwood Anderson Short Story Winners.

BookBroads: Sherwood Anderson Book Prize Winner. The Sherwood Anderson Foundation honors Lucy Jane Bledsoe.

1001 Short Stories You Must Read Before You Die: Hands.

Mark Whalan references my book Stein, Gender, Isolation and Industrialism: New Readings of Winesburg, Ohio in his book Race, manhood, and modernism in America: the short story cycles of Sherwood Anderson and Jean Toomer. A description of his book follows.


  • Race, Manhood, and Modernism in America offers the first extended comparison between American writers Sherwood Anderson (1876--1941) and Jean Toomer (1894--1967), examining their engagement with the ideas of "Young American" writers and critics such as Van Wyck Brooks, Paul Rosenfeld, and Waldo Frank. This distinctively modernist school was developing unique visions of how race, gender, and region would be transformed as America entered an age of mass consumerism. Focusing on Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio (1919) and Toomer's Cane (1923), Race, Manhood, and Modernism in America brings Anderson and Toomer together in a way that allows for a thorough historical and social contextualization that is often missing from assessments of these two literary talents and of modernism as a whole.

Wednesday, September 09, 2009

For a funny parody of anti-gay protesters, and other people who use out-of-context Bible verses to make themselves look superior, see God Hates Shrimp. One of my essays, with a similar message, follows.



The Bible and Gays, an essay from
Holding Me Together.

“And Ruth said [to Naomi], Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go; and whither thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God: Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried: the Lord do so to me, and more also, if aught but death part thee and me” (Ruth 1:16-17).

“I am distressed for thee, my brother Jonathan: very pleasant hast thou been unto me: thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women” (II Samuel 1:26).

“Every man shall kiss his lips that giveth a right answer” (Proverbs 24:26).

God gave us each other for companionship (Genesis 2:18). Certain people need to reproduce, but not everyone (Matthew 19:12; I Corinthians 7:1-8). The Creation accounts never mention gays as part of God’s Creation, but they also never mention the disabled or the different races. Besides two passages that sound like gay relationships (Ruth 1:16-17; II Samuel 1:26), most people who object to homosexuality would probably rather not visualize John 13:5; Proverbs 24:26; I Samuel 18:1-5; II Samuel 20:3-4, 16-18, 33-34.

“Behold, this was the iniquity of thy sister Sodom, pride, fullness of bread, and abundance of idleness was in her and in her daughters, neither did she strengthen the hand of the poor and needy” (Ezekial 16:49).

The Bible blames the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah on wickedness, greed, callousness, and inhospitably (Genesis 14-19; Ezekial 16:49; Mark 6:11; Matthew 10:14). Only sheer inventiveness can force “wicked” to mean “gay.” God decides to destroy the cities, but says He will spare them for ten good men. After God’s decision, some men say they want to “know” the visiting angels; somehow, that part of the Sodom passages will become the basis for using the entire story against gays, as if all the people (including the babies) of both cities are gay.

Depending on which translation we use, the Bible contains three-twelve apparent condemnations involving male/male sex, one involving female/female sex, and around 360 involving male/female sex. Many Bible scholars say most of the male/male passages actually condemn rape or temple prostitution, but that the biases of translators warp them into anti-gay references. Remember that the nomadic Hebrews desperately needed children to replace those killed from battles, draughts, and slavery; they condemned all forms of birth control and understood very little about human sexuality.

Leviticus says not to eat fruit from a young tree (19:23), read horoscopes (19:26), get a haircut (19:27), get a beard trim (19:27), get a tattoo (19:28), eat shellfish (11:9-12), eat meat with fat or blood (3:17), crossbreed cattle (19:19), plant two different kinds of seed in the same field (19:19), wear clothing of mixed fabric (19:19), eat pork (11:7-8), or touch pigskin (11:8, so much for football). It also condemns gay male sex twice, once calling it an “abomination.” However, Leviticus 20:25 shows Levitical use of the word “abomination” to only mean vulgar or not kosher.

The Bible also says not to use profanity (Colossians 3:8), get drunk (Proverbs 20:1), pray aloud in public (Matthew 6:1-8), swear (Matthew 5:34), call someone worthless or a fool (Matthew 5:22), or charge interest to poor people (Ex. 22:25). It demands the death penalty for using God’s name in vain (Leviticus 24:16), having pre-marital sex (Deuteronomy 22:13-21), a son acting stubbornly or rebelliously (Deuteronomy 21:18-21), and children cursing their parents (Leviticus 20:9). The death penalty for adultery (Leviticus 20:10) could include a divorced person who remarries (Matthew 5:32, 19:9; Mark 10:11-12). Paul gives two lists that condemn every person ever born (Romans 1; I Corinthians 6:10), but clever uses of ellipses can make those lists only condemn gays. With selective reading, the Bible also sanctions slavery (Ephesians 6:5; Leviticus 25:44-46), allows men concubines or multiple wives (II Samuel 5:13; I Kings 11:3; II Chronicles 11:21; Deuteronomy 21:15), bans the disabled from worship services (Leviticus 21:18-23), and establishes negative views of women (Exodus 21:7; Leviticus 12:1-8, 15:19-33, 20:18; I Corinthians 11:5, 14:34; I Timothy 2:9-15).

“But avoid foolish questions, and genealogies, and contentions, and strivings about the law; for they are unprofitable and vain” (Titus 3:9).

“For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved” (Romans 10:13).

“There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female: for ye are all one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28). See also Matthew 7:1-5, 23:5-6, 23:24; Luke 18:10-14; Colossians 3:8-14; Romans 2:1-3, 7:6, 13:8-10, 14:10-13; I Corinthians 7:6, 7:25; Galatians 3:28; Hosea 1:2; Titus 3:9-11; all of I John. Fortunately, salvation comes simply from accepting Jesus as Lord and Savior (John 3:16-17; Romans 10:13), not from laws, literalism, or appearances of holiness. Some people of faith will say the verses I list here are irrelevant, especially if these verses happen to be the ones that those people violate. But the verses someone else violates are, of course, all important. What convenient theology!

Coming from a Christian fundamentalist background, I know all too well how people like to pick and choose Bible verses to use against each other. Unfortunately, that promotes nothing but division and condemnation, helping no one.

If you’re a Christian, please focus on the Bible’s overall messages: faith, hope, love, compassion, salvation. We miss those when we pick and choose out-of-context verses to use against each other. I pray that God will teach us all to love each other, instead of warping the Bible into yet another excuse for hatred, violence, exclusion, and alienation.

This page is sometimes funny, sometimes insightful: As I’ve Matured. I related to a lot of it.

Tuesday, September 01, 2009

SyFy has posted a new trailer for the upcoming spin-off series Stargate Universe. I’m a long-time fan of Stargate, but this new show looks like a major departure, with a bigger budget and more drama.

Tuesday, August 11, 2009


Science Fiction Adventure.


For a limited time, the Kindle eBook of Degranon is available at a special low price, to introduce new readers to my science fiction adventure series, Sons of Taldra. I’m currently writing the second book in the series. Readers can also order Degranon in paperback and hardcover through Barnes & Noble and many other bookstores.

Monday, August 10, 2009

Sordid Lives: The Series

And speaking of returning TV series, it still looks unlikely the wonderful Sordid Lives: The Series will ever return. Still, you can enjoy clips from the show, thanks to creator Del Shores.

SordidLiveschannel

Shores based Sordid Lives on his play and movie about a West Texas family. I still hope he gets the movie version of his play Southern Baptist Sissies made!
V Returning Sooner (Updated 8/11/09)


From SyFy: ABC announces V will debut in November and V producer on who might return and other homages.

The original miniseries and its sequel included some interesting parallels to Nazi Germany, but the series lacked a budget and direction. Will the new series be better, or worse?

ABC’s V Preview makes it look better.

Wednesday, August 05, 2009

Sherwood Anderson News

KevinFromCanada Blog: Sherwood Anderson Category Archive.

Blogger Joel J. Miller references what Anderson and others say about book marketing: Don’t Just Blame The Marketing.

All Free Essays: Winesburg, Ohio.
Midwestern Literature: Sherwood Anderson (a great man from ohio).
Blogcritics.org: Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson.
BookLoveAffair: Friday Focus: Sherwood Anderson.

University of Toledo professor Clarence Lindsay has released a new book, Such a Rare Thing: The Art of Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio. According to the synopsis, “This critical study of Sherwood Anderson's most famous and perhaps most widely taught work, Winesburg, Ohio, treats it as a thoroughly modernist novel examining the aesthetic nature of romantic identity.”

Monday, August 03, 2009

The historical West Texas town of Acorn was founded by the Briggs family or the Carsons family, depending on who you ask. Just slide on over to the Turner Street Café and you’ll find some cranky old geezer willing to give you an earful about that. The pictures you see here are of our historical Seventh Street district and of one of the many oak trees planted here during the 1950s by the Fischers, a family of German immigrants that nearabouts bankrupted what little water supply we had back then…but who can argue with the results? You don’t see this many trees in Lubbock!

Founded: 1934.

Area: 25 square miles (includes recent annexation).

Current population: 21,001.

Altitude: 3,245 feet above sea level.

Geography: flat, flatter, and flattest.

Weather: mostly mild winters (except for the occasional ice storm), mostly mild spring through fall (except for the occasional dust storm, Easter freeze, or tornado).

Worship: Catholic or Presbyterian for some, Baptist for the rest of us.

Wild Life: prairie dogs, squirrels, ground owls, various widows. The horses and cows are mostly *outside* the city limits, but some Acornians like to dress up as cowboys and cowgirls anyway.

Night Life: Three bars, open from 11 AM to 2 AM. A movie house/restaurant. Concerts are no longer encouraged in Acorn, but sometimes happen at the bars. We also don’t encourage the presence of a certain “adult” establishment, which we’ve managed to rezone outside our city limits. We do encourage and support Acorn College Football, day or night games!

Reasons to visit:

(1) German festival!

(2) The best chicken-fried steak and apple pie this side of Throckmorton!

(3) Close to Lubbock and Amarillo!

(4) Antiques shops and an art gallery!

(5) As far as we can figure, no film students have ever turned up missing here.

(6) Acorn College, and more importantly, Acorn College Football!

(7) How 'bout those sunsets?

(8) Unlike the people in Happy, Texas, we wouldn't mind if you made a movie about us, as long as you gave us lots of money.

(9) A short drive to Roswell, New Mexico.

(10) A short drive from Roswell, New Mexico, if you get tired of the alien hunters.

(11) We’re nothing like West Texans in movies or that ***** Greater Tuna play. (The preceding sentence was edited for a word that made me have to put a quarter in the cuss jar.)

(12) We have a more “normal” name than Shallowater, Levelland, Muleshoe, Throckmorton, or Earth, Texas. We love to brag about our beautiful name.

(13) Though he may deny it and tell us to take this off our Web site, rumor has it that a certain famous West Texan who now lives in D.C. attended a frat party or two here. Maybe he just doesn't remember.

(14) None of our citizens have been on that Survivor TV show or American Idol, but we have a daily Wheel of Fortune Viewers Club, over at the Ice Cream Dream, and you don’t know Fear Factor until you’ve been to Acorn’s Cow Palace on Karoake Night.

(15) According to the latest recount, we still have more marriages than divorces.

(16) Trees! We’ve got ‘em!

(17) Acorn Lake! It ain’t big (we had to fight over the right to call it a lake), but it’s pretty!

(17) Have we mentioned the sunsets?

(18) The Dixie Chicks have never written a song about us. No, really, we don’t want them to.

(19) Friday Night Lights! Not the book, movie, or TV series—just the real deal!

(20) We all talked about voting for Kinky Friedman, even before he thought about running for Governor of Texas and replacing Governor Goodhair!

(21) No, really, our mayor isn’t gay. Well, the old one said he wasn’t either, before he ran off with that fellow Whathisname.

(22) Community organizers, and re-organizers. Between the Carsons family and the Briggs family, you never know who’s buying what!

(23) Lubbock author Duane Simolke wrote a book about us! Read the reviews at Kirkus, Amazon.Com, Amazon.Com (1st edition), bn.com (2nd edition), and bn.com (1st edition).

Kindle Edition.

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

This scene opens Fat Diary, a comical short story I wrote for the book The Acorn Gathering.


January 20, 2001
Dear Fat Diary,

My nutritionist told me to write in you every day, until I can come to terms about why I’m not happy with my weight, and why I want to change. I’m supposed to call you my “love diary,” but I’m not trying to get rid of love; I’m trying to get rid of fat. We’ll talk about love later.

No, on second thought, we’ll talk about love now. I don’t have love because I have fat. If I didn’t weigh 260 pounds, I might be writing a love diary, and teenage girls would read it and swoon, while listening to the latest boybands and dreaming of that guy who sits in the second row of their American history class. Wait, that’s what I did at the University of Texas in Austin.

My name is Pamela Mae Willard, named after my Aunt Mae and my father, Samuel Carsons (yes, as in “Carsons Furniture, Acorn’s best-kept secret”). He wanted a Samuel Carsons, Jr. He had to settle with a Pamuel, which became Pamela, due to the mercy of the Father, the Son, the Holy Ghost, and my passive-aggressive mom. She kept “accidentally” referring to my father as “Samueluel,” and when that bothered him, she said she “didn’t give a damnuel,” and when he wanted supper, she said he could fry some “Spamuel,” and if he wanted someone to keep him warm, he could “buy a cocker spaniel.” Even though she never actually said how much she hated the name “Pamuel,” the message came through clearly enough, and he eventually asked if Pamela Mae would be all right.

Pamela Mae sounded sufficiently dignified and Southern for a member of Acorn’s beloved Carsons family, so she consented, and soon began cooking meals that weren’t primarily composed of meat byproducts. Harmony soon returned to our home, and my parents adopted an unwanted newborn baby just over a year later, naming him Samuel, of course, but calling him “Sam.” If they were going to go through all of that just to call someone “Sam,” they probably could have named me Samantha! Unfortunately, I wasn’t quite in a position to impart my keen sense of logic at the time.

My parents were very happy with Sam, who would eventually join the Air Force. I taught Sunday school for a time and, after returning from college in Austin, managed the library.

Our childhood went by with very little trauma or disaster. Meteorites, tornadoes, and general flying debris never hit our house, unless you count acorns, pecans, and the occasional dust storm. Daddy wasn’t a drunk, though he always liked touring the wineries that keep popping up around West Texas. Mom didn’t have a secret past, unless it’s still Acorn’s best-kept secret, to use that tired catch phrase I mentioned before, the one Daddy’s store shares with most of Acorn’s local advertisers. And my adopted brother didn’t turn out to be a space alien, despite my early suspicions; in fact, he and I remain the best of friends. Regardless of how some people around here make it sound, the sky isn’t always falling in Acorn, at least not for our family. I had loving parents and a happy, well-rounded childhood.

“Well-rounded.” Bad word choice.

I grew taller fast during my early teens, so much so that my mom worried I might have some sort of thyroid disorder, and it seemed like I needed to eat a lot for my body to keep up with its own growth. But then I stopped growing. Upward, that is. Then I got fat, and I stayed fat. So here I am, writing in my fat diary. Worst of all, I’ll probably wind up writing about my joke of a short-lived marriage.

I’m supposed to examine key moments from any of my amazing thirty-something years, and find reasons to love myself, all the while congratulating myself for the conclusions I reach.

Do I get a lollipop for that?

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

Bio, With Links.

Duane Simolke (pronounced “Dwain Smoky”). Education: Belmont University (B.A., ‘89, Nashville, TN), Hardin-Simmons University (M.A., ‘91, Abilene, TX), and Texas Tech University (Ph.D., ‘96, Lubbock, TX), all with a major in English.


Writing published in nightFire, Mesquite, Caprock Sun, Midwest Poetry Review, International Journal on World Peace, and many other publications.


I also wrote the preface to Ronald L. Donaghe’s gay novel Lance: The Continuing Journals of Will Barnett.


Who’s Who Among America’s Colleges and Universities, 1988-89.


At the Conference on Christianity and Literature, presented papers, "Pilgrim's Progress As Satire" (1990) and "C.S. Lewis's Till We Have Faces" (1991).


1991, Masters Thesis, This Present Darkness and Its Influences.


Two Texas Tech University English Department Harbinger Awards for Excellence in Short Fiction.


1996, Doctoral Dissertation, Stein, Gender, Isolation and Industrialism: New Readings of Winesburg, Ohio.


At the 2001 Convention of The National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association (NLGJA), spoke on the panel “Writing with a Texas Twist.”


Two StoneWall Society 2002 Pride In The Arts Awards. Acceptance for The Acorn Stories. Acceptance for Holding Me Together.


2003 StoneWall Society Pride in the Arts award for Degranon.



Dann Hazel used Reactions to Homophobia (a long essay from Holding Me Together) as one of the resources for his book Witness: Gay and Lesbian Clergy Report from the Front. Kris Coonan, UQ Union, University of Queensland, used it as a resource for his article Sexual Prejudice: Understanding Homophobia and Heterosexism, Biphobia and Transphobia. The Queensland Government's Community Benefit Fund and PFLAG Brisbane used it as a resource for the PDF booklet Assisting Those Who Come Into Regular Contact with Lesbian and Gay Youth.

November 2003, at the Texas Book Festival, signed copies of The Acorn Stories.


October 2005, lead the discussion Gay Symbols and History.


Three of my books recognized as iUniverse Editor’s Choice books: The Acorn Stories, Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure, and Holding Me Together.


February 2006, part of View from Brokeback Mountain panel discussion.


June 2006: The Acorn Stories and Holding Me Together featured in discussions and spoken word presentations at the first StoneWall Society Pride in the Arts Festival, Walton, West Virginia.


Noted a few times during Jed Ryan’s interview with StoneWall Society’s founder.


The Return of Innocence received a 2007 Allbooks Reviewer’s Choice Award.


March 2007: Featured author at Razor Pages.


July 2009: Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure discussed in Encyclopedia of Contemporary LGBTQ Literature of the United States.


May 2010: Featured in books Belmont University People: Belmont University Alumni, Belmont University Faculty, Trisha Yearwood, Kimberley Locke, Brad Paisley and Hardin-Simmons University Alumni: Doyle Brunson, Buddy West, Rupert N. Richardson, Dan Blocker, Victor G. Carrillo, George H. Mahon.


August 2010: Interview at AuthorIsland.


September 2010: Featured Writer, Bitsy Bling's Book Review.

Monday, June 29, 2009

The Acorn Stories: The Individual Stories

"Acorn": When we arrive at the fictional West Texas town of Acorn, the narrative keeps shifting between Regina and Dirk, who both seek control over their relationship.

"Flip, Turn": A different scene from the narrator's amusing but unproductive life comes to him every time he turns to swim in the opposite direction.

"Keeping A Secret": A little boy wants to shield his mother and his little brother from a dangerous situation.

"Survival": A young teacher (both deaf and gay) clashes with his school's emphasis of uniformity over diversity and sports over academics.

"Paying The Rent": In this politically incorrect tale, an inarticulate young man hopes to marry a rich woman so he can pay the rent, but he finds her repulsive.

"Morgana Le Fay": A widow finds her new romance disrupted by her Siamese cat's strange behavior.

"Your Daughter": Gretchen's approach to raising a daughter and maintaining a marriage requires ignoring problems and carefully orchestrating conversations.

"Knock": A father sees his daughter abandon her Mexican heritage, and he now fears other types of abandonment.

"Come With Me": The conflictive influence of her overbearing sister and her supportive husband forces Becky to re-evaluate her ambitions.

"Dead Enough": Farcical look at English departments, tabloid TV, the publishing industry, and America's superstar culture.

"Mae": Standing by her husband's grave, an elderly woman looks back at the joys and challenges of marriage and motherhood.

"Timothy Fast": In this satirical retelling of the Faustian myth, a Jewish businessman finds himself pulled into small-town politics.

"Mirrors: A Blackmail Letter": The owner of an art gallery becomes the target of a "family values" witch-hunt, spear-headed by Acorn's closeted (“ex-gay”) mayor.

"Echoes": A time of unexpected changes for Becky and her husband.

"Oak": Julie Briggs can only talk to her mother by leaving messages on her answering machine, but she refuses to give up her voice.

"Acorn Pie": An unusual weekend in the life of an unusual town.



Read the reviews at Kirkus, Amazon.Com, Amazon.Com (1st edition), bn.com (2nd edition), and bn.com (1st edition).

Kindle Edition.

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

my video channel

I’m happy to see my video channel receiving an increasing surge in traffic. Thanks to everyone who has taken the time to watch, forward, embed, and/or favorite my videos!

Of course, many of the most popular online videos right now involve the protests over Iran’s election. See farzinfakhraei’s channel for some of those videos.

Saturday, June 20, 2009

The Acorn Stories.
By Duane Simolke.
Pride in the Arts Award.

Visit the West Texas town of Acorn! Enjoy the German festival, a high school football game, homemade apple pie from the Turner Street Cafe, and the cool shade of a hundred-year-old oak tree. Meet dedicated teachers, unusual artists, shrewd business owners, closeted gays, and concerned neighbors. See how lives become intertwined in moments of humor or tragedy. Just be careful, because in Acorn, the sky is always falling!

From romantic comedy to razor-sharp satire to moments of quiet reflection, these award-winning tales transform a fictional West Texas town into a tapestry of human experiences.

  • “A lush tangle of small-town life branches out in this engrossing collection of short stories.” –Kirkus
  • “I found this book to be a perfect vacation companion.” –A. Chandler, #1 Amazon.Com reviewer
  • “A talented, insightful author.” –E. Conley, Betty's Books
  • “The town is Acorn, Texas, and it is a representation of all of the tiny places, or wide places in the road that dot America.” –jonboy
  • “If you liked WINESBURG, OHIO . . . rejoice.” –Watchword
  • “By the time you have finished reading these tales of the people who inhabit the fictitious town of Acorn, Texas, population 21,001, you will have met some endearing as well as irritating characters, from the Mayor to the local would-be gigolo; from the busy-bodies to the business owners; from those who grew up in Acorn and have tried to escape the small town to those who have moved to Acorn to escape from the real world.” –Ronald L. Donaghe, author of Uncle Sean
  • “A well-crafted collection of short stories.” –L. L. Lee, author of Taxing Tallula
  • “It was a real pleasure to read about the fictional town of Acorn, Texas.” –Mark Kendrick, author of Desert Sons
  • “Simolke makes good use of his vivid imagination in creating credible dialogue and satirical images.” –Huda Orfali, author of Blue Fire
  • “There are people that you like, some that you can't wait to see if they get theirs.” –Joe Wright, StoneWall Society
  • “Each of Simolke's stories lets us look into the lives of some of the most interesting characters I have ever read about.” –Amos Lassen, Literary Pride
  • “When you finish, when you put the book aside, Acorn will still be with you.” –E. Carter Jones, author of Absence of Faith
  • “I highly recommend this book!” –Richard Carlson, author of Jeremy Grabowski's Crazy Summer in Stormville!
Read the reviews at Kirkus, Amazon.Com, GoodReads, bn.com (2nd edition), and bn.com (1st edition).

Kindle Edition Barnes & Noble Nook eBook Excerpts from The Acorn Stories The Individual Stories Reading Group Questions Historical Acorn, Texas

Book Trailer: West Texas Fiction Book Trailer 2: Texas

The Acorn Gathering, a Spin-off from The Acorn Stories

(Blog entry updated 08/09/2014.)

Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure
By Duane Simolke
Winner, Pride in the Arts Award
On the planet Valchondria, no illness exists, gay marriage is legal, and everyone is a person of color. However, a group called “the Maintainers” carefully monitors everyone’s speech, actions, and weight; the Maintainers also force so-called “colorsighted” people to hide their ability to see in color.

The brilliant scientist Taldra loves her twin gay sons and thinks of them as the hope for Valchondria’s future, but one of them becomes entangled in the cult of Degranon, and the other becomes stranded on the other side of a doorway through time. Can they find their way home and help Taldra save their world?

  • “This is an incredible book about the human condition and how one person striving for the good can, in the end, be a source of change.” –Rainbow Reviews
  • “So for those who want a thought provoking and fun sci-fi read, then I would highly recommend Degranon; so hover on over to the bookstore and check this one out.”—Blogger Girls
  • “In Degranon, author Duane Simolke establishes his voice in gay genre writing by combining current concerns revolving around queer culture with a world of dimensional doorways, advanced technology, and distant planets.” –X-Factor, October 1, 2004 issue
  • “It's a very good story.” –HomoMojo.Com and I Must Be Dreaming
  • “A must read.” – Joe Wright, for StoneWall Society
  • “A reminder of the danger of fanaticism.” –Mark Kendrick, author of Stealing Some Time
  • “Duane Simolke's latest offering is a fascinating scifi excursion into a world as unique as his singular vision.” –Ronald L. Donaghe, author of Cinátis
  • “I recommend DEGRANON for its exciting, well-constructed narrative, its often intriguing characters, and its wealth of ideas both political and philosophical.” –J. Clark
  • “DEGRANON is sci-fi that warrants the attention of any serious aficionado, gay or straight, fascinated by alien worlds that mirror our own world.” –William Maltese, author of Beyond Machu

New! Revised third edition eBook released in 2016. Nook and Kindle.

Join the Degranon discussions at Goodreads, Shelfari, and Black Caviar Book Club.

Though it takes place on other worlds, all the characters in this book are people we might call Native American, African American, Hispanic, Asian, or Middle Eastern. Some of them are also gay. Degranon deals with themes of diversity, censorship, and religious violence. It takes place in an alternate dimension, with some of our prejudices and other problems looked at from unusual angles. More importantly for most scifi fans, though, it delivers fast-paced action and constant twists.

Excerpt: We’re Glad Our Son Is Gay.

Excerpt: The Maintainers Arrive.

Degranon: Reading Group Questions.

Book Trailer 1, Book Trailer 2, Book Trailer 3.

Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure discussed in Encyclopedia of Contemporary LGBTQ Literature of the United States.

A glossary for Degranon and its upcoming sequel, Sons of Taldra.

Sons of Taldra: GoodReads Preview, Book Teaser/Spoiler Alert, Writing a Novel.

Nook, Fishpond.co.nz, Fishpond.co.au, Degranon: Kindle eBook, Kindle Germany, Gay Science Fiction Worlds, Gay Science Fiction for Canadian Readers, Gay Science Fiction for the UK, SciFi/Fantasy Adventure, Gay Science Fiction at bn.com, Fantasy Adventure at bn.com, Gay Fantasy at bn.com, Science Fiction Adventure at bn.com.

Entry updated 08/14/2014.

Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure

Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure
By Duane Simolke
Winner, Pride in the Arts Award
On the planet Valchondria, no illness exists, gay marriage is legal, and everyone is a person of color. However, a group called “the Maintainers” carefully monitors everyone’s speech, actions, and weight; the Maintainers also force so-called “colorsighted” people to hide their ability to see in color.

The brilliant scientist Taldra loves her twin gay sons and thinks of them as the hope for Valchondria’s future, but one of them becomes entangled in the cult of Degranon, and the other becomes stranded on the other side of a doorway through time. Can they find their way home and help Taldra save their world?


  • “This is an incredible book about the human condition and how one person striving for the good can, in the end, be a source of change.” –Rainbow Reviews
  • “So for those who want a thought provoking and fun sci-fi read, then I would highly recommend Degranon; so hover on over to the bookstore and check this one out.”—Blogger Girls
  • “In Degranon, author Duane Simolke establishes his voice in gay genre writing by combining current concerns revolving around queer culture with a world of dimensional doorways, advanced technology, and distant planets.” –X-Factor, October 1, 2004 issue
  • “It's a very good story.” –HomoMojo.Com and I Must Be Dreaming
  • “A must read.” – Joe Wright, for StoneWall Society
  • “A reminder of the danger of fanaticism.” –Mark Kendrick, author of Stealing Some Time
  • “Duane Simolke's latest offering is a fascinating scifi excursion into a world as unique as his singular vision.” –Ronald L. Donaghe, author of Cinátis
  • “I recommend DEGRANON for its exciting, well-constructed narrative, its often intriguing characters, and its wealth of ideas both political and philosophical.” –J. Clark
  • “DEGRANON is sci-fi that warrants the attention of any serious aficionado, gay or straight, fascinated by alien worlds that mirror our own world.” –William Maltese, author of Beyond Machu

New! Revised third edition eBook released in 2016. Nook and Kindle.

Both Taldra #SciFi Adventure Novels in One EBook

Join the Degranon discussions at Goodreads, Shelfari, and Black Caviar Book Club.

Though it takes place on other worlds, all the characters in this book are people we might call Native American, African American, Hispanic, Asian, or Middle Eastern. Some of them are also gay. Degranon deals with themes of diversity, censorship, and religious violence. It takes place in an alternate dimension, with some of our prejudices and other problems looked at from unusual angles. More importantly for most scifi fans, though, it delivers fast-paced action and constant twists.

Excerpt: We’re Glad Our Son Is Gay.

Excerpt: The Maintainers Arrive.

Degranon: Reading Group Questions.

Book Trailer 1, Book Trailer 2, Book Trailer 3.

Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure discussed in Encyclopedia of Contemporary LGBTQ Literature of the United States.

A glossary for Degranon and its upcoming sequel, Sons of Taldra.

Sons of Taldra: GoodReads Preview, Book Teaser/Spoiler Alert, Writing a Novel.

Nook, Fishpond.co.nz, Fishpond.co.au, Degranon: Kindle eBook, Kindle Germany, Gay Science Fiction Worlds, Gay Science Fiction for Canadian Readers, Gay Science Fiction for the UK, SciFi/Fantasy Adventure, Gay Science Fiction at bn.com, Fantasy Adventure at bn.com, Gay Fantasy at bn.com, Science Fiction Adventure at bn.com.

Monday, June 15, 2009

Sneak a peak at The Return of Innocence

Read a preview at Amazon.

The Return of Innocence: A Fantasy Adventure Preface

Preface

During my teen years, I wrote several science fiction and fantasy stories. Most of those got lost during moves, but one of them grew into the novel Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure, which led to the sequel Sons of Taldra. I occasionally tried to develop a novel from my 1983 fantasy story “The Return of Innocence.”

The novel, however, remained unfinished for years, still a sketchy jumble of drafts and notes with potential. I eventually considered cowriting it with a fantasy author. When I mentioned the idea to my friend Toni Davis, she decided to read through some of the chapters and quickly fell in love with my fantasy world of Theln. Toni mostly wrote poetry and fan fiction back then, but wanted to explore new characters.

Toni brought fresh perspectives to a long-neglected project by interjecting ideas, fleshing out characters, and exposing flaws. Unfortunately, work and her own projects took her away from Theln. Eventually, I combined our ideas to write a complete draft. Though the finished book only includes a little of her writing, it also contains her inspiration, and I appreciate her efforts in making sure I could finish Sasha Varov’s story. I revised the novel in 2017.

Duane Simolke, Lubbock, Texas

Saturday, June 13, 2009

I've just posted Excerpts from The Acorn Gathering, in the blog for that fiction collection.

We’re Glad Our Son Is Gay



The following excerpt comes from the revised, second edition of my novel Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure.


The planet Valchondria seems advanced and remarkably humane in many ways. But the government regulates people's weight, reproduction, theology, actions, and speech; the government also forbids travel and contact beyond Valchondria's atmosphere. A charismatic leader called "Gazer" leads the cult of Degranon; he promises change, but at a violent and oppressive cost. In between these two dystopias (failed Utopias), we find Taldra and Hachen, striving to make a better world for their twin sons. Obviously, the book raises many social issues, but it often does so in humorous or exciting ways. This scene obviously pokes fun at the ridiculous Earth tradition known as "homophobia," but it still has some scary overtones. (The Valchondrians use "same-gendered" in place of the words “gay” or “homosexual.”)


Her gray eyes sparkled like no eyes Hachen had ever seen. Actually, she had broken the law by secretly telling him that her eyes were light brown, but, unlike his gifted spouse, he couldn’t see in color. He couldn’t even see the redness of her skin, though he knew from history class that most people on Valchondria have red, brown, or black skin, and some of the people who had once lived there had yellow or white skin. To him, everyone simply looked white or black.


During history classes, before the Maintainers expunged certain anti-glory facts from the school curriculum, Hachen had learned about how white-skinned people and yellow-skinned people faded from existence. After the Supreme Science Council realized that those two races contracted certain illnesses that no one else contracted, they worked with the Maintainers to pass a constitutional amendment, banning any two members of those races from marrying. The measure supposedly protected Valchondria’s families and stability. Within three generations, both races ceased to exist; only the red, black, and brown races remained obvious, or some mixture of the three.


That time in Valchondria’s history brought outcries of shame, and the government vowed to never again use the law to promote bigotry. But then, little more than a hundred years later, the SSC found that obesity caused many illnesses, adding to increased national healthcare costs. So another constitutional amendment passed, this one allowing the Maintainers to fine people for not keeping a healthy height-to-weight ratio.


And after the virus came, the Maintainers and the SSC passed yet another constitutional amendment that promoted discrimination. That one made the ridiculous assertion that discussing colorsightedness posed a heavy hazard threat to traditional values, and that claiming to be colorsighted was nothing more than a plea for so-called “special rights.” It amazed Hachen that a civilized culture could keep taking away people’s civil rights. It also hurt him, because the woman he loved was the target of that bigotry.


And the new forms of bigotry kept emerging. Next came legally permitted language, initially called “socially recommended rhetoric,” creeping slowly into schools and the media and then into the law. And then Maintainer cameras came. And freedom left. All in the names of preserving traditional Valchondrian values. All suffocating Valchondrian creativity, thought, and progress.


Hachen clasped the slender hand that reached toward the tiny person in the infant pod that was attached to the bed.


“I’ll get him,” said Hachen. He gently lifted the pale infant, who was wrapped in a white cloth as soft and warm as his skin.


“I was hoping to be able to say ‘them.’” She accepted the crying child into her arms, and he grew quiet as she rocked him back and forth.


“We had to work quickly. It’s bad enough we’re violating the codes. We can’t jeopardize Geln’s career as well as our own.”


“I know, Hachen. I just wanted a chance to see them both. I can’t believe I passed out during the birth.”


“I think those mind relaxants had something to do with it. I’m just glad no other healers came in. No one knows except for you, me, and Geln.”


“Wouldn’t the gossip masters love this story? ‘Leading scientists discover a rift in time and transport illegal twin into the past. Check your collector for details.’” She rubbed the tiny infant’s red face, and he seemed to smile. “Is this Argen, or Telius?”


“Argen,” said Hachen, sitting down on the edge of the bed. They had agreed on given names for the twins long before Taldra even started showing. “They’re identical. I performed a genetic scan; they’re both healthy and of potentially high intellect. Telius will need that to survive in his primitive environment.”


“But you said the village is peaceful. Hachen, where are we sending our baby?”


“Someplace where he at least has a chance.” Hachen had never seen her look so vulnerable before, like anyone could crush her with a touch. Before, she always projected herself as brave and outspoken, sometimes even reckless, but he could tell becoming a mother would change her. Somehow, she seemed less courageous but more protective. He tried to think of words to reassure her. “The village is peaceful. I just meant that he won’t have all the luxuries and protections we have. He’ll be like…well, like a colonist.”


The look of worry gave way to one of wonder. “I like that analogy.” She smiled at the baby who slept in her arms. “Maybe one day, we’ll all be on one colony together, the four of us.”


“That sounds nice. To the side, the genetic scan also showed that they’re both same-gendered.” Hachen used the term with pride, and Taldra smiled with the same pride. At least no one ever came up with the crumbled idea of discriminating against people who identified romantically and emotionally with members of their own gender. No culture could ever be that rusted, he told himself, but then thought again of how utterly ridiculous he saw all other forms of bigotry; none of it made sense. Discrimination and prejudice never made any sense at all to Hachen.

Holding Me Together, featuring Reactions To Homophobia.

SWS Pride in the Arts For The Record Award! Reactions to Homophobia counters anti-gay comments (“Adam and Steve," “Sodom and Gomorrah,” “special rights,” “cures,” etc.). The revised, second edition of Holding Me Together begins with an updated version of Reactions to Homophobia, followed by poems and short essays on a variety of topics, such as writing, AIDS, religion, racism, violence, friendship, family, and gay relationships. It also includes many new or newly revised essays and poems.


Visit the Smashwords page for Holding Me Together to read Reactions to Homophobia. Just click your choice under “Available Ebook reading formats.” It’s part of the free preview.

Table of Contents

Part One: Reactions to Homophobia, An Essay

Reactions to Homophobia: Introduction. “Unlike gay people, I don't tell people what my wife and I do in bed.” “They can be gay, as long as they hide it.” “If a normal guy or a white guy gets beat up, hate crimes laws can't help him. That isn't fair.” “I’m not queer, so why I should care about those people?” “We shouldn't have to see gays when we watch TV or movies.” “I would accept gays, but I believe in family values.” “Family members spending time with their gay relatives would suggest that they endorse that lifestyle.” “They live that gay lifestyle.” “It's an insult to African Americans to compare being gay to being black.” “The parts don't fit.” “If we weren't so tolerant of gays, there wouldn't be any.” “I wouldn't mind gays if it weren't for them checking me out.” “Having gay parents makes children gay.” “Gay people should try to be cured.” “Homosexuality is a mental illness.” “If everyone were gay, we'd stop having children, and die out.” “You deserve what happens to you, because you choose to be gay.” “Accepting homosexuality destroyed empires like Greece and Rome, and even led to the Holocaust.” “They recruit.” “They just haven't met the right person of the opposite sex yet.” “Gays can't adopt, because their children will get teased, and that isn't fair.” “God sent AIDS to the homosexuals because He loves His children and wants to turn them back to Him.” “God didn't create Adam and Steve.” “The Bible says it's wrong.” “The Bible says God destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah because of gays.” “I love the sinner, hate the sin.” “Anyone who condones homosexuality can’t be religious or moral.” “We can't allow gay marriages, because tradition protected heterosexual marriage and reproduction for thousands of years.” “Public schools need to quit hiring gays and quit promoting homosexuality.” “Gays can't serve in the military, because that would disrupt efficiency.” “Surveys prove gays are a much smaller number than they claim, that their average lifespan is 44 years, and that they have 5000-15,000 partners per year.” “Homosexuals are just a bunch of men dressing up like women.” Reactions to Homophobia: Conclusion. Resources for Reactions to Homophobia.

Part Two: Poems and Short Essays Home. Chasing Seagulls. Rainbow. How “Children in the Streets” Wrote Itself. Children in the Streets. Children in the Streets (Song Version). Friday Afternoon Spectrum. Reception. Album. Can God Cure You? Digging Up “The Gardener.” The Gardener. second year. Separated. Angels and Razors. Question. Faces, Parts I-VII. Process. Songs In Sign Language. Forgotten. Sock Poem. Higher Education. Haiku. TV Senyru. Not Worth Dying Over. Siblings, Ten Voices. Homeless, I: Cities Don't Build People. Homeless, II: Also. Family. Ex-Gay? Part I: Cocoon. Ex-Gay? Part II: The Ex-Me Movement. Ex-Gay? Part III: Who Does God Hate? Spiral Staircase. Violence. Storm. The Escape Artist. Daughter. The Same Lips. Pharisee. The Loss. Adding to the Hurt. Bareback (Gay Men/HIV/Unsafe Sex). Success. Spelunker. Out Of the Closet. The John Doe Family. Family Reunion. A Great American Voice. Anne Bradstreet. Cycle. Cross. Hero. Two Rapes. If: A Satire. The Bible and Gays. Tonight’s Wind. Denial. Undetected. Elephant on an Opera Stage. Detour. Editing.

More About the Author and His Works.


Dann Hazel used Reactions to Homophobia as one of the resources for his book Witness: Gay and Lesbian Clergy Report from the Front. Kris Coonan, UQ Union, University of Queensland, used it as a resource for his article Sexual Prejudice: Understanding Homophobia and Heterosexism, Biphobia and Transphobia. The Queensland Government's Community Benefit Fund and PFLAG Brisbane used it as a resource for the PDF booklet Assisting Those Who Come Into Regular Contact with Lesbian and Gay Youth.


“By killing yourself, intentionally or through unsafe sex, you call yourself worthless and expendable. How can you think of a human being that way? Quit punishing yourself for the bigotry in society. Refuse to help the cause of homophobia. Take care of yourself. Learn to love yourself and protect yourself. See yourself and your partner as worth protecting. Treat safer sex as an act of defiance and gay pride, a statement about your love for yourself, a statement about the value of your life. Treat living each day as a tear in the fabric of bigotry.”

From Not Worth Dying Over, an essay in Holding Me Together. Copyright 1999/2005 Duane Simolke. Paul Harris quotes that passage in the book From Our Own Lips: The Book of GLBT Quotations. Minnie Van PileUp (the pseudonym of a writer who lives in Boston) quotes the same passage in The Quotable Queer: Fabulous Wit and Wisdom from the Gays, the Straight, and Everybody In-Between.

Mountman, a reviewer for StoneWall Society, has created animated versions of two poems from Holding. Visit MS Agent Pages for the software and links. (Note: the poems are earlier versions, and slightly different from how they appear in Holding’s 2nd Edition.)

Artist Roger Beauchamp created Team Leviticus, artwork based on Reactions to Homophobia.

Rainbowslash created the video He Holds Me Together for Home, one of the poems from Holding Me Together.

StoneWall Society used my books The Acorn Stories and Holding Me Together for spoken word readings during its Pride in the Arts Festival (Virginia, 2006).


Excerpts from Amazon.com reader reviews of Holding Me Together’s first edition follow.

“In his exploration of what it is to be gay, Simolke manages to touch on a more fundamental truth: what it is to be human.” –Watchword

“If I had a magic wand, I would put this book in the hands of all our gay or questioning youth.” –author, painter, dancer Copernicus again

“In the long essay, ‘Reactions to Homophobia,’ readers will meet an intelligent and patient narrator who takes virtually every ignorant question and misstatement seemingly ever made about gays and lesbians and, as though speaking to those who ask such questions or make disparaging remarks about homosexuals, refutes the ignorance.” –author Ronald L. Donaghe

(Referring to the poems…) “My personal favorite is the aptly titled ‘Home’, which also provides the book's title. ‘Home’ describes the presence and the touch of a lover as ‘holding me together’. ” –James Whitney


In a review that previously appeared at QMediaReviews.com, critic Shawn Revelle called the revised, second edition of my book Holding Me Together “an inspiring and timely collection of works.” Revelle went on to share details about the book, which he also called “a worthwhile and life-affirming read.”

If you like my writing, please support it by ordering one of my books for yourself or someone else.

Read about Holding Me Together at bn.com, Amazon, Am.ca, Am.uk, Fishpond.co.au, or Fishpond.co.nz.

Now available, eBook versions of Holding Me Together at Barnes & Noble Nook, Amazon Kindle, and Smashwords.Com.

Also available, the short eBook Selected Poems includes the gay love poem “Home,” the strange story of “The Gardener,” and the comical “Angels and Razors,” as well as thirty other poems from Holding Me Together.

Entry revised on 02/23/2015.

I've moved my links here. Please note that my GeoCities site will soon close. If you have links or bookmarks to me there, please change them to my permanent domain name.

http://DuaneSimolke.Com

SciFi/Fantasy/Horror Links (including literature).



Aberrant Dreams. A Magazine of Speculative Fiction.


Allscifi.com: Zany Sci-Fi discussion coupled with very detailed reviews.


Bewildering Stories offers a home and an audience to speculative writing; all genres are welcome in prose, poetry, drama and non-fiction.


Christine Jones. Writer resources and more from a diverse Australian writer whose work includes the fantasy series Mariard.


The Dragon Page Podcasts. Science Fiction and Fantasy taken to the next level.


Fantafiction. Gathering and sharing info about sf/f.


FranJacobs.Com. Website of fantasy writer, Fran Jacobs, author of the Shadow Seer.


Science Fiction and Fantasy World. More than 10,000 pages of SF and Fantasy related content.


SciFan. Books and links for the science fiction fan.


SciFi Dimensions. An online science fiction magazine.


Scifimatter.com
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SFBook.com is your Science Fiction book resource on the net.


SFBookcase.com. Latest books—all the latest science fiction and fantasy news.


SFReader.com. Science Fiction Books, Fantasy Books, Horror Books, and Book Reviews.


SFRevu is a monthly fan/webzine focused on Science Fiction and Fantasy, which features reviews of books, films, and other media, Interviews with top authors and notable newcomers, and columns with the latest releases in books, DVDs, and comics and upcoming films.


SF Site. The Home Page for Science Fiction and Fantasy.


Slacker’s Sci-Fi Source. Your source for all things sci-fi on the web!


SpecFicWorld.com. The online resource guide for science fiction, fantasy, and horror fans and writers.


The Steed Zone. Family with two SF authors presents site with excerpts, writer resources, and more!


Storm The Castle Science Fiction and Fantasy: Books, Movies, Posters, and much more!




Unique Posters and Wallpaper images
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White Unicorn Books. Online only bookstore, including extensive sf collection, plus author links.


Withywindle Books. A virtual bookstore specializing in fantasy, science fiction, and horror used and rare books.



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AllBookReviews.Com. Chosen one of 101 Best Websites for Writers two years in a row by Writer's Digest Magazine.


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Authonomy. A Harper-Collins site for readers and writers.


AuthorsDen. Where authors and readers come together!


The Beckham Publications Group. Unique book publishing company offers joint venture self publishing project to promote the works of young and budding writers.


Blogcritics.org. A sinister cabal of superior bloggers on music, books, film, popular culture, and technology - updated continuously.


BookCrossing is a book exchange of infinite proportion, the first and only of its kind.


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How To Publish A Book Blog. The ZDocs blog, with information and resources for the self-publishing author.


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Internet Book List. An independent database of book information for all people, whether they are the occasional reader or a librarian.


Jude Liebermann - online romance novels. Features Jude Liebermann's action/adventure sci/fi romance novels, ebooks & free short stories; visit to read her free online ebook.


JoanHallHovey.Com. Award-Winning author of Nowhere To Hide; read Joan Hall Hovey's "Note to Aspiring Writers."


Library Thing. Enter what you're reading or your whole library—it's an easy, library-quality catalog; LibraryThing also connects you with people who read the same things.


MyShelf.Com is a book-related web site aimed at readers and writers; it includes contests, reviews, columns, holiday reading lists, and Deaf Characters lists.


Native American Storytellers. Original short stories and poems shared by the members of the Yahoo Club/Group, Native American Storytellers.


New Canadian Novels. Author Charles W. Shirriff presents links and reviews, as well as information about his novels.


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Razor Pages. Giving Voice to Independent Authors.


Shawna R. Van Arum. Fiction, poetry, writer resources, and more from published writer!


Shelfari. Using Shelfari, you can create a personal shelf of your books, see what your friends are reading, get and give recommendations for what to read next, create book lists, and even share your opinion on a book with friends or the growing Shelfari community.


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StoryMania.com. Publish with us or browse through our collection as you please for free.


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WeBook. Writing loves company: creative writing prompts, ideas, topics, activities.


WriteSight.com. Be Seen...Be Discovered at the Ultimate site for writing exposure.


Zero Point – Power of the gods is a modern adventure story that begins when two college professors are asked to examine an ancient archaeological discovery.



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